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    Wellbeing North Star

    August 16th, 2012

    Wellbeing North Star, created by Kimberly Wiefling, allows you to analyze all angles of your situation in order to reach your desired end state. By comparing what you like and dislike about different aspects of your product, meeting, work day, etc., you can identify where your efforts are needed most to ensure that you achieve your goal.

    Timing: 1 hour
    Ingredients:

    • Online access

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Team Leader
    • Employees

    Directions:
    You can instantly play Wellbeing North Star online with as many members as you would like! Clicking on the image above will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com; simply email the game link to your team to invite them to play. In the game, the image to the right will be used as the “game board.” You will see three types of icons in the upper left corner.

    • Note card: area of concern
    • Happy face: what is working (put in sections with “+”)
    • Frown face: what is not working (put in sections with “-“)

    Simply drag the note card icons to the squares and describe the concerns they represent. Then, players drag the faces to the chart and describe what they represent to organize the positive and negative aspects of the concerns.

    Players can edit the placement and description of each light bulb, which everyone can view in real time. Use the integrated chat facility and communicate with your players throughout the game to get a better understanding of each move. After the game, the results will be organized in a spread sheet to maximize the benefits of the game.

    Key Points:
    Opinions are valuable when it comes to determining what is and isn’t working. Rather than lowering your expectations and allowing for mediocre results, put in the energy now to enhance your present state. Play Wellbeing North Star to get back on the track that everyone agrees will lead to your goal.

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    Innovation Generator

    August 16th, 2012

    Scott Sehlhorst, President of Tyner Blain LLC, developed this game for players to come up with the necessary components of innovation: invention and value.

    Timing: 1 hour
    Ingredients:

    • Online access

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Development Team

    Directions:

    You can instantly play Innovation Generator online with as many members as you would like! Clicking on this image will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com; simply email the game link to your team to invite them to play. In the game, the image will be used as the “game board.” The chart is organized into three columns.

    1. Customers’/Prospective Customers’ Problems
    2. Invention/Value
    3. Innovation

    You will see light bulb and sticky note icons in the upper left corner. The light bulbs represent inventions and the sticky notes symbolize all other ideas in the three columns.

    To begin, players think of problems that customers within your market may have. To add the ideas, simply drag sticky notes to the chart and describe what they represent. Next, work as a group to choose about five inventions (represented by the light bulbs) your company has or could create. Ask your players to explore the values these inventions have — other than their current purposes — and to post their ideas around the inventions in the second column. Think of how these values can resolve the problems noted in the first section. Doing so ensures that your team’s innovations focus on meeting your stakeholders’ needs.

    Finally, add sticky notes to the third column to describe new innovations you can create by combining the second column inventions with their values. Focus on innovations that address the notes from column one. This will ensure that the exercise leaves you with useful information that responds to customers’ needs.

    Players can edit the placement and description of each icon, which everyone can view in real time. Use the integrated chat facility and communicate with your players throughout the game to get a better understanding of each move.

    Key Points:

    Using creative thinking to uncover various ways to apply a product inspires teams to develop new applications for inventions and form solutions that address stakeholders’ needs. And by identifying customer problems first, all ideas will be geared toward helping those who hold the key to your success. Whether creating new inventions or reusing past ones, Innovation Generation is perfect for teams to brainstorm ways to help customers and stay ahead of the competition.

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    Customer-Centric

    August 15th, 2012

    Scott Sehlhorst, President of Tyner Blain LLC, developed this graph to improve product development by understanding which stakeholders are impacted most by your product.

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • Online access
    • A product

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Development Team

    Directions:
    Clicking on this image will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com; simply email the game link to your team to invite them to play. In the game, the image to the right will be used as the “game board,” which organizes the various people who are impacted by your product. The chart contains four concentric circle, signifying the following:

    • Innermost: The product (ex. Pest Control Software)
    • 2nd: System – direct stakeholders (ex. Manager)
    • 3rd: Containing system – stakeholders of the system, even if they don’t directly interact with it (ex. Service technician)
    • 4th: Wider Environment – stakeholders outside of the environment (ex. Suppliers, customers)

    In the upper left corner, you will see a note card icon and people icons. Begin by dragging the note card to the center of the chart and indicating the product you are focusing on. Then, work as a team to identify stakeholders that belong in each area by dragging the people icons to the circles and describing who they represent. This requires you to think outside the box (or shall we say circle?), as each user persona will be connected to many others within the ecosystem.

    Players can edit the placement and description of each icon, which everyone can view in real time. Use the integrated chat facility and communicate with your players throughout the game to get a better understanding of each move. After the game, the results will be organized in a spread sheet to maximize the benefits of the game.

    Key Points:
    One reason products fail is because teams do not solve the problems that are important to the right users. These personas are not always obvious, as they may be associated with the product through indirect connections. With this game, you can identify the vast web of people your product impacts and explore the complex butterfly effect; doing so reveals which stakeholders are most important and what your product requirements are.

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    SAFE-BOLD Framework

    August 13th, 2012

    This game is based on the “SAFE-BOLD Framework” diagram described in the book The Challenger Sale: Taking Control of the Customer Conversation, written by Corporate Executive Board’s Executive Director Matthew Dixon and Managing Director Brent Adamson.

    Timing: 1 hour
    Ingredients:

    • Online access
    • A product
    • Potential customers

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Marketing Team
    • Sales Team

    Directions:

    Play SAFE-BOLD Framework to develop a compelling pitch that teaches customers how your product can solve problems and improve their lives. Clicking on the image above will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com; simply email the game link to your team to invite them to play. In the game, the image to the right will be used as the “game board.” The chart organizes ideas based on 4 scales.

    Scale 1: Scale

    • Left – “Small” = ideas that do not make customers curious or intrigued; customers have probably already thought of these
    • Right – “Big” = ideas that customers see as far-reaching

    Scale 2: Risk

    • Left – “Achievable” = ideas that are not risky
    • Right – “Outperforming” = ideas that are risky and innovative, push customers out of their comfort zone, and show that you can help them get ahead of their competitors

    Scale 3: Innovativeness

    • Left – “Following” = ideas that are used, dull, not innovative
    • Right – “Leading-Edge” = ideas that ask customers to take a risk by adopting your ideas

    Scale 4: Difficulty

    • Left – “Easy” = ideas that customers can implement without your help
    • Right – “Difficult” = ideas that are hard for customers to implement, so they will have to hire your company to help them

    You will see note card icons in the upper left corner of the chart, which represent team members’ ideas. Simply drag a note card to the area you are thinking of and describe what the icon represents. Players can edit the placement and description of each note card, which everyone can view in real time. Use the integrated chat facility and communicate with your players throughout the game to get a better understanding of each move.

    Key Points:
    The visual organization and simple scales of SAFE-BOLD Framework provide the organization needed to effectively brainstorm sharp ideas that will teach your customers of a new problem, be tailored to their business needs, and allow reps to control the sales situation to change customers’ thought processes and behaviors. By developing a provocative Commercial Teaching pitch that is big, risky, innovative, and difficult to implement, you can demonstrate your knowledge of your customers’ problems and provide a unique solution while separating yourself from your competitors.

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    Challenger Selling Model

    July 26th, 2012

    This game is based on the “Challenger Selling Model” Venn diagram illustrated in the book The Challenger Sale: Taking Control of the Customer Conversation, written by Corporate Executive Board’s Executive Director Matthew Dixon and Managing Director Brent Adamson.

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • Online access

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Various Teams (sales, marketing, production, etc.)

    Directions:
    Play this game to transform your sales strategy into the Challenger Selling Model: an effective technique based on reps who can teach customers, tailor their message, and take control of the situation all while leveraging constructive tension. Clicking on this image will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com; simply email the game link to your team to invite them to play. In the game, the image to the right will be used as the “game board.” The Venn diagram organizes players’ ideas to design an effective Challenger tactic.

    • Top = “Teach for Differentiation” – insight that reframes how a customer may see their business and needs
    • Bottom Left = “Tailor for Resonance” – sales messages geared toward the values of the customer
    • Bottom Right = “Take Control of the Sale” – how to pursue goals assertively to overcome customer aversion
    • Outer Area = “Constructive Tension” – how a rep can use tension to their advantage

     

    You will see note card icons in the upper left corner of the chart, which represent team members’ ideas. Simply drag a note card to the area you are thinking of and describe what the icon represents. Players can edit the placement and description of each note card, which everyone can view in real time. Use the integrated chat facility and communicate with your players throughout the game to get a better understanding of each move.

    Key Points:
    Becoming a Challenger demands that reps provide a unique perspective, be attentive to customer needs and values, and assert control while leveraging tension to their advantage. However, many teams must cooperate to bring different points of view for a successful transition to the model. Challenger Selling Model provides the visual organization necessary to balance the integral factors of the model while promoting the collaboration needed to help your team construct the most effective sales strategy for a specific stakeholder.

    For more about the Challenger Selling Model, click here.

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    Innovation Ambition MatrixMatrice des ambitions pour l’innovation

    July 5th, 2012

    Innovation Ambition Matrix was inspired by the May 2012 Harvard Business Review article, “Managing Your Innovation Portfolio,”  written by Monitor’s revolutionary co-partners: Bansi Nagji and Geoff Tuff.

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • Online access

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Development Team

    Directions:
    Play Innovation Ambition Matrix to clarify the ambition of a project, develop a cohesive operation rather than a scattering of competing advancements, and identify how to balance your team’s effort allocation.

    Clicking on this image will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com. In the game, this image is used as the “game board.” The axes of the matrix are labeled as follows:

    • X-axis: “How to Win.” This is designated for the novelty of the product that you are offering to customers. Are you using existing, adding incremental, or developing new products?
    • Y-axis: “Where to Play.” This measures the novelty of your customers. Will the innovation serve an existing, enter an adjacent, or create a new market?

    The chart is divided into three three levels of innovation ambition.

    • Core (closest to origin): optimize your current products for current customers (ex. make faster technology)
    • Adjacent: add a new feature to your existing business (ex. create an app version of your website)
    • Transformational: create breakthroughs for markets that do not currently exist

    There is a light bulb icon in the top left corner of the game board, representing the initiatives players are taking and the ideas they have about future accomplishments. Simply drag the light bulbs to the matrix and describe what they represent.

    Players can edit the placement and description of each light bulb, which the team can view in real time. Use the integrated chat facility and communicate with your players throughout the game to gain a better understanding of each move. The results will be organized in a spreadsheet to maximize the benefits of the game.

    Key Points:
    A company’s survival depends on its ability to innovate and advance. However, ideas to do so often become diluted by poor management strategies. This leaves your team with a chaotic scattering of competing attempts rather than a unified innovation effort. By identifying how to allocate innovation activity, teams can strike and maintain their unique balance required for sustainable growth. Innovation Ambition Matrix helps identify this core:adjacent:transformational ratio, which enhances a team’s understanding of where to put efforts and how to unify endeavors. Also, the game helps managers survey the initiatives of their team and provides a chance to discuss the overall ambition of a project.

    To learn more about Bansi Nagji and Geoff Tuff, and the importance of a balanced innovation profile, click here.

    Objectif du jeu

    La Matrice des ambitions pour l’innovation s’inspire d’un article paru en 2012 dans la Harvard Business Review : “Animez votre portefeuille d’innovations”, écrit par les deux associés du cabinet de conseil révolutionnaire Monitor Group : Bansi Nagji et Geoff Tuff. Ce jeu très productif permet à des équipes d’élaborer une vision globale sur la façon d’aller de l’avant, en organisant sur trois niveaux les objectifs et les initiatives. Jouez à la Matrice des ambitions pour l’innovation pour clarifier les ambitions d’un projet, élaborer une approche cohérente plutôt qu’un feu d’artifice d’initiatives concurrentes, et déterminer comment répartir l’effort de votre équipe.

    Nombre de joueurs

    5 à 8

    Durée du jeu

    1 heure

    Règles du jeu

    1. Commencez par dessiner un graphique sur un grand tableau blanc ou une affiche. Étiquetez les axes comme suit :

    • Abscisse : “Jouer pour gagner”, qui désigne le caractère novateur du produit que vous offrez à vos clients. Utilisez-vous des produits existants, faites-vous évoluez vos produits ou développez-vous de nouveaux produits ?
    • Ordonnée : “Terrain de jeu”, qui mesure la nouveauté de vos clients. L’innovation servira-t-elle un produit existant, l’entrée sur un marché adjacent, ou la création d’un nouveau marché ?

    2. Dessinez ensuite trois courbes entre les axes (cf. image ci-dessous) pour matérialiser trois niveaux d’ambition en matière d’innovation.

    • Innovation de base : optimiser vos produits actuels pour vos clients actuels (ex : rendre la technologie plus rapide)
    • Innovation par adjacence : ajouter une nouvelle fonctionnalité à votre métier actuel (ex : créer une version mobile de votre site web)
    • Innovation transformationnelle : créer des percées sur des marchés qui n’existent actuellement pas.

    3. Distribuez des post-its et des stylos aux membres de votre équipe. Demandez-leur d’inscrire les initiatives sur lesquelles ils travaillent actuellement et de les positionner dans la zone concernée sur le graphique. Jouer avec plusieurs personnes permettra de déterminer quelles initiatives sont en cours et fera émerger des points de vue différents sur la façon de réussir.

    4. Lorsque toutes les initiatives et les idées sont affichées, discutez de la façon de canaliser le travail de tout le monde pour que chacun contribue à la même mission. Cela permettra d’éliminer des développements concurrents et permettra à chacun de comprendre l’objectif global en matière d’innovation.

    Stratégie

    Le jeu fonctionne mieux quand les joueurs sont des membres de l’équipe qui ont des responsabilités différentes au sein du projet. Cela permettra au groupe de comprendre les différentes initiatives en cours et éliminera les efforts contre-productifs. Après vous être débarrassé des post-its concurrents, travaillez avec l’équipe pour identifier et répartir des tâches précises.

    Même si la Matrice des ambitions pour l’innovation est utile pour mettre en valeur les efforts actuels de l’équipe et clarifier l’ambition d’un projet, elle peut également être utilisée pour travailler sur les objectifs à long terme de votre entreprise. Déterminez l’objectif de votre entreprise ou de votre équipe ainsi que le niveau d’innovation nécessaire pour vous aider à y arriver. Par exemple, si vous souhaitez renforcer la position de votre entreprise dans votre secteur d’activité, concentrez-vous sur les innovations de base ou par adjacence. Si vous avez besoin d’opérer un changement important pour prendre de l’avance sur le marché, pensez à des innovations transformationnelles. Planifier les efforts nécessaires vous permettra d’atteindre de manière efficace vos ambitions en matière d’innovation pour votre entreprise.

    Lien pour Jouer en ligne

    Points essentiels

    La survie d’une entreprise dépend de sa capacité à innover et à garder son avance. Pourtant, les idées pour le faire sont souvent diluées par des stratégies de management très médiocres. Cela invite votre équipe à se disperser dans un chaos de tentatives concurrentes au lieu de concentrer son effort en matière d’innovation. En identifiant la façon de répartir les activités d’innovation, les équipes peuvent trouver et maintenir l’équilibre nécessaire à une croissance durable. La Matrice des ambitions pour l’innovation permet d’identifier ce ratio de répartition base/adjacence/transformationnelle, améliorer la compréhension d’une équipe pour qu’elle concentre ses efforts vers le même but. En outre, le jeu permet aux managers de superviser les initiatives de leurs équipes et fournit une occasion de rediscuter de l’ambition globale d’un projet.

    Pour en savoir plus sur Bansi Nagji et Geoff Tuff, et de l’importance d’adopter un profil d’innovation équilibré, cliquez ici.

    Matrice des ambitions pour l'innovation

    Note du traducteur :
    Cette matrice est inspirée de la Matrice d’Ansoff. En réalité, le portefeuille d’innovation de chaque société couvre généralement les trois niveaux. Une bonne règle de base est que 70% des investissements sont au niveau 1, 20% au niveau 2, et seulement 10% dans le niveau 3. Cependant, en termes de potentiel de création de valeur, les rapports sont inversés : les innovations transformationnelles peuvent potentiellement générer 70% de la valeur globale des activités d’innovation.

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    2 Brains: Tell It & Sell It

    June 13th, 2012

    This game, originating from Thomas J. Buckholtz, helps organize practical and emotional aspects of your product or service, which can then be combined to create the most compelling pitch.

    Timing: 1 hour
    Ingredients:

    • Internet access
    • A product or service

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager
    • Promotional Team

    Directions:
    Clicking on the image to the right will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com. You will see the image used as the “game board.” A yellow post-it icon will be in the upper left corner, which symbolizes the players’ ideas; team members add these ideas by simply dragging them to the appropriate region on the chart and describing what they represent. The matrix categorizes the notes based on their “Practical Appeal” (x-axis) and “Emotional Appeal” (y-axis). The goal is to create the most notes in the upper right (maximum logos and pathos). Everyone can view and edit the position of the post-its in real time, which optimizes collaboration among the players. The results are organized in a spreadsheet for you to analyze at the end of the game.

    Key Points:
    Just like brain lateralization — the right hemisphere controls imagination and feelings while the left side manages facts and details – creating a persuasive slogan or pitch requires a balance of both logic and emotion. By organizing ideas with 2 Brains: Tell It & Sell It, you can effectively identify how to achieve this combination in order to captivate your audience.

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    Job or Joy

    March 21st, 2012

    Timing:

    • 1 hour

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • You and your colleagues

    Ingredients:

    • Internet access

    Directions:
    In Job or Joy, players share their hobbies, tedious chores, and what they like or dislike about work. This enhances your understanding of the participants while uncovering ways to make work more fun. Clicking on the image to the right will take you to an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com. Here, this image will be used as the “game board,” which categorizes the four different types of activities you and your coworkers do.

    • Quadrant 1: Joy – work activities that people enjoy (ex. conferences)
    • Quadrant 2: Hobbies – activities outside of work that people enjoy (ex. reading, biking, cooking)
    • Quadrant 3: Chores – activities outside of work that people don’t enjoy (ex. cleaning)
    • Quadrant 4: Job – work activities that people don’t enjoy (ex. mundane office meetings)

    You will also see two icons in the top left corner:

    • Happy face: what you like to do
    • Frown face: what you don’t like to do

    To add the icons, simply drag them to the board and describe what they represent. Everyone can collaborate and edit the placement and description of each image, which can be seen in real time. The results will be organized into a spreadsheet at the end to optimize the benefits of the game.

    Key Points:
    When people enjoy what they are doing and become engaged through self-motivation, they can push themselves to form innovative ideas and breakthroughs. Their participation is catalyzed by the activity they are involved in and they channel their personal commitment toward achieving the goal. Play Job or Joy to discover what your colleagues like/dislike to do in order to better understand who they are and how you can all maximize your joy and productivity — both during and outside of work.

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    Circles of Influence

    December 14th, 2011

    Timing:

    • 1 hour

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Project manager or facilitator
    • Internal team

    Ingredients:

    • internet access
    • a goal

    Directions:
    Circles of Influence, created by Deb Colden, can help you achieve your action potential by identifying connections that will lead you to success. Take advantage of this game to expand your network and turn your thoughts into plans.

    Clicking on the image to the right will start an “instant play” game at innovationgames.com. Here, these two circles will be used as the “game board,” which will help you organize your connections and support. As a group, define your goals by dragging the blue stars from the upper left corner to the top of the board and describing what each represents. Then, move on to the circles.

    • Left circle: “Circle of the Task”
    • Right Circle: “Board of Directors”

    The “Circle of the Task” represents people who can help you accomplish your goal. “Board of Directors,” is for people who will help you no matter what, and on whom you can rely on to provide encouragement and advice.

    There will be two different icons that players can drag onto the circles and describe to represent your network:

    • Green people – those in your “Circle of the Task”
    • Blue people – those on your “Board of Directors”

    All moves can be seen in real time by each participant, so everyone can edit the positions and descriptions of the icons. Also, the integrated chat facility allows you and your players to collaborate to uncover your connections.

    Key Points:
    This game involves visual organization and extensive collaboration to identify people who will help you reach your destination. By writing specific names, you can turn potential connections into beneficial relationships, and form a more focused approach on how to achieve your objective. Get the job done by expanding your network while utilizing the support of those who know you best.

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    Mitch Lacey Team Prioritizationseriouseriouseriouseriou

    October 5th, 2011

    This prioritization game was inspired by the innovative Agile and Scrum expert, Mitch Lacey. As described in his book, The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice for Your First Year, the collaboration and visual organization involved in this activity provides a painless way to manage backlogs, making your task list less daunting and more effective.

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • A list of backlog items (epics / stories) to prioritize.

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Team Manager
    • Stakeholders and/or Internal Team

    Directions:

    Clicking on this image will start an instant play Innovation Game® at innovationgames.com. You will see the image as the “game board” and notecard icons at the upper left corner, which represent your backlog items.

    The graph measures two aspects of each task:

    • X-axis = “Size.” This charts the complexity of the backlog items
    • Y-axis = “Priority.” This arranges tasks based on their urgency. It can be measured by anything the players agree is important, such as ROI or business value.

    The chart is divided into three columns to help your team organize assignments based on the amount of effort needed to complete them.

    Backlog items are represented by the note card icons found at the upper left corner of the graph. Players simply drag the icons to the game board and describe what they represent. All participants can then edit the placement and description of each notecard, which can be viewed in real time. Use the integrated chat facility to collaboratively organize the tasks and gain a better understanding of the placements and moves.

    Work as a team to examine the backlog items in the upper right region of the chart. Is there any way to divide these large, high-priority tasks to make them more manageable? These smaller assignments may then be separated to different areas depending on their size and priority level. This will make your to-do list less daunting and more efficient. When all the notes are in their appropriate places, order them in a to-do list by starting with those in the top-left corner and moving clockwise.

    At the end of the game, the results will be organized in a spreadsheet to maximize its benefits. All of the items, their placement values, and the chat history will be included for post-processing.

    Key Points:
    This game gets team members thinking differently about backlog items. Rather than making a scattered list of debilitating tasks, the Mitch Lacey Team Prioritization arranges your accumulated assignments according to the level of priority and effort needed to accomplish them, allowing for productive advancements.

    References
    Mitch Lacey describes this game in his book The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice For Your First Year.

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • A list of backlog items (epics / stories) to prioritize.

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Development Team

    Directions:

    Team Estimation GameThis is an estimation game based on Mitch Lacey’s book The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice For Your First Year. In this game, notecards represent user stories or other work items. The following description is adapted from Mitch’s book: Scrum A Year One Survival Guide. Clicking on the image to the right will start an instant play Innovation Game®.

    Height determines priority. Stories at the top are higher priority; stories at the bottom are lower priority. A story’s priority can be based on ROI, business value, or whatever else the players agree is important.

    Width is reserved for size/effort/complexity. Stories on the left are smaller/ easier; stories on the right are bigger/harder.

    Team members and stakeholders should collaboratively organize the stories – and use the chat logs to shape their feedback.

    The quadrants help you identify how you should organize your work. Items in the top-left quadrant are high priority and small. They’ll end up in the top of your work/product backlog. The stories in the top- right are high priority and large. You should break most of those down into smaller stories because they’ll be coming up in the first several sprints. As the stories are broken down, you may find that some are higher priority than others and that a few might even move to a different quadrant.

    Use the integrated chat facility to negotiate about your notecards. And any player can edit a noecard to keep track of the agreements of the team. This means that cards will move around during the game as the value of an item increases or decreases or the development team considers various ways of implementing an item.

    To get the final results of the game, simply download the Excel spreadsheet. All of the items and their placement values will be available to you for post-processing, including all of the chats.

    Key Points:

    • This is not a learning game. This is a “do work” game. When you’re done with this game, you’ll be able to get a much better sense about how to prioritize your backlog items by reviewing them in clockwise order.

    References

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • A list of backlog items (epics / stories) to prioritize.

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Development Team

    Directions:

    Team Estimation GameThis is an estimation game based on Mitch Lacey’s book The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice For Your First Year. In this game, notecards represent user stories or other work items. The following description is adapted from Mitch’s book: Scrum A Year One Survival Guide. Clicking on the image to the right will start an instant play Innovation Game®.

    Height determines priority. Stories at the top are higher priority; stories at the bottom are lower priority. A story’s priority can be based on ROI, business value, or whatever else the players agree is important.

    Width is reserved for size/effort/complexity. Stories on the left are smaller/ easier; stories on the right are bigger/harder.

    Team members and stakeholders should collaboratively organize the stories – and use the chat logs to shape their feedback.

    The quadrants help you identify how you should organize your work. Items in the top-left quadrant are high priority and small. They’ll end up in the top of your work/product backlog. The stories in the top- right are high priority and large. You should break most of those down into smaller stories because they’ll be coming up in the first several sprints. As the stories are broken down, you may find that some are higher priority than others and that a few might even move to a different quadrant.

    Use the integrated chat facility to negotiate about your notecards. And any player can edit a noecard to keep track of the agreements of the team. This means that cards will move around during the game as the value of an item increases or decreases or the development team considers various ways of implementing an item.

    To get the final results of the game, simply download the Excel spreadsheet. All of the items and their placement values will be available to you for post-processing, including all of the chats.

    Key Points:

    • This is not a learning game. This is a “do work” game. When you’re done with this game, you’ll be able to get a much better sense about how to prioritize your backlog items by reviewing them in clockwise order.

    References

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • A list of backlog items (epics / stories) to prioritize.

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Development Team

    Directions:

    Team Estimation GameThis is an estimation game based on Mitch Lacey’s book The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice For Your First Year. In this game, notecards represent user stories or other work items. The following description is adapted from Mitch’s book: Scrum A Year One Survival Guide. Clicking on the image to the right will start an instant play Innovation Game®.

    Height determines priority. Stories at the top are higher priority; stories at the bottom are lower priority. A story’s priority can be based on ROI, business value, or whatever else the players agree is important.

    Width is reserved for size/effort/complexity. Stories on the left are smaller/ easier; stories on the right are bigger/harder.

    Team members and stakeholders should collaboratively organize the stories – and use the chat logs to shape their feedback.

    The quadrants help you identify how you should organize your work. Items in the top-left quadrant are high priority and small. They’ll end up in the top of your work/product backlog. The stories in the top- right are high priority and large. You should break most of those down into smaller stories because they’ll be coming up in the first several sprints. As the stories are broken down, you may find that some are higher priority than others and that a few might even move to a different quadrant.

    Use the integrated chat facility to negotiate about your notecards. And any player can edit a noecard to keep track of the agreements of the team. This means that cards will move around during the game as the value of an item increases or decreases or the development team considers various ways of implementing an item.

    To get the final results of the game, simply download the Excel spreadsheet. All of the items and their placement values will be available to you for post-processing, including all of the chats.

    Key Points:

    • This is not a learning game. This is a “do work” game. When you’re done with this game, you’ll be able to get a much better sense about how to prioritize your backlog items by reviewing them in clockwise order.

    References

    Timing: 1 hour

    Ingredients:

    • A list of backlog items (epics / stories) to prioritize.

    Players (5..8 recommended):

    • Product Manager / Product Owner
    • Development Team

    Directions:

    Team Estimation GameThis is an estimation game based on Mitch Lacey’s book The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice For Your First Year. In this game, notecards represent user stories or other work items. The following description is adapted from Mitch’s book: Scrum A Year One Survival Guide. Clicking on the image to the right will start an instant play Innovation Game®.

    Height determines priority. Stories at the top are higher priority; stories at the bottom are lower priority. A story’s priority can be based on ROI, business value, or whatever else the players agree is important.

    Width is reserved for size/effort/complexity. Stories on the left are smaller/ easier; stories on the right are bigger/harder.

    Team members and stakeholders should collaboratively organize the stories – and use the chat logs to shape their feedback.

    The quadrants help you identify how you should organize your work. Items in the top-left quadrant are high priority and small. They’ll end up in the top of your work/product backlog. The stories in the top- right are high priority and large. You should break most of those down into smaller stories because they’ll be coming up in the first several sprints. As the stories are broken down, you may find that some are higher priority than others and that a few might even move to a different quadrant.

    Use the integrated chat facility to negotiate about your notecards. And any player can edit a noecard to keep track of the agreements of the team. This means that cards will move around during the game as the value of an item increases or decreases or the development team considers various ways of implementing an item.

    To get the final results of the game, simply download the Excel spreadsheet. All of the items and their placement values will be available to you for post-processing, including all of the chats.

    Key Points:

    • This is not a learning game. This is a “do work” game. When you’re done with this game, you’ll be able to get a much better sense about how to prioritize your backlog items by reviewing them in clockwise order.

    References

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