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    Nexus Zoo (a scaling simulator)

    July 27th, 2016

    This game was designed by Mark Noneman and Don McGreal for a presentation on the Scrum.org Nexus framework.

    This is a fun and effective way to replicate the challenges of scaling product development across many teams.
    It puts teams into a situation where they need to turn their individual features into one collective increment within a Sprint. They need to work out how to manage dependencies between teams as well as cross-team requirements and constraints. Consider running this exercise right before introducing a group to a scaling framework, such as Nexus.

    Teams working together


    Ingredients:

    • At least 3 teams of 3-9 people.
    • Multi-colored paper (at least 32lb paper stock)
    • Enough sharpies for everyone
    • A folder with 3-hole binding and a transparent cover
    • 3-hole punch
    • A Definition of Done & Non-Functional Requirements (printed out or written on flip chart) – here is an example
    • A Product Backlog (on cards) – here is an example

    Directions:

    1. Setup: Teams are presented with a Product Backlog and constraints (Definition of Done & NFRs) for a bound booklet about animals in the Nexus Zoo. Each Product Backlog item represents a page in the booklet (along with some acceptance criteria).
      Example PBIs:
      Cover Page : Zoo logo and name centered on top of page ; Map of the zoo ; Images of at least three animals
      Narwhal Page: Show both common and scientific name; Three sentence description of animal ; Sketch of the animal ; Same color paper as Unicorns ; Small zoo logo on top right

    2. Plan: Teams have 4 minutes to select at least one item from the Product Backlog and plan their Sprint.

    3. Sprint: Teams have a 10 minute Sprint to create a complete increment. The increment must meet the Definition of Done.
      e.g.: Common copyright, center bottom of every page; 1 color Sharpie per page; Text should be clear and readable with no crossed-out wording (errors); One-sided page; Integrated into the booklet; No more than 3 of the same color paper; No 2 consecutive same color paper.

    4. Observe: Just step back and let it happen. As a facilitator you really shouldn’t have to do anything else. The point of it is to see how separate teams self-organize to deal with dependencies. You can give your honest opinion about things they are making, but if you are asked any questions about how to proceed, just play dumb.
      For example, we were asked what the copyright should say exactly, we just said ‘Oh wow, never thought of that. What do you think?’. The participant then looked up copyright laws on his phone and presented us with options. We picked one and he then asked how the other teams would know to use the same copyright text. We just shrugged our shoulders. So he grabbed a mic and made an announcement to the rest of the room.

      Some things to look out for:

      • How do the teams coordinate between the animals that share page colors?
      • How do they work out restricting how many same color pages end up in the booklet?
      • How do they agree on what the copyright should be? How do they communicate it to all the teams?
      • How and when do they integrate into the main branch (the binder)? Do they wait until the end and create a bottleneck? Or add pages continuously?
      • Do they form any new roles or groups? Do certain people take responsibility for integration? What about cross-team constraints?
    5. Debrief: Stop the Sprint promptly at the 10 minute mark and examine the increment with everyone.
      Debrief the exercise by pointing out many of your observations. Discuss pros & cons of their scaling practices and start to tie it to the Nexus framework (or any scaling solution).

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    Silent Collaboration

    November 10th, 2015

    This is a great facilitation exercise for quickly seeding a Product Backlog or anything else that requires collaboration. It is a technique that I’ve used for years and was originally inspired by Lyssa Adkins’ Silent Work Techniques

    Steps:

    1. Divide participants into groups of 4-8 people.
    2. Provide each participant with 3X5 cards and a sharpie.
    3. Seed the product backlog by using the first 15% of your story writing timebox for silent writing.
    4. Then, have each participant take turns reading one of their stories.
    5. After the story is read, the group discusses and decides whether it is suitable or not. If so, put it in the middle of the table. If not, rewrite it or destroy it.
    6. If any participant has a similar story as the one being presented, they alert the group and then destroy one of the duplicates.
    7. Continue in this manner until all the stories are either in the middle of the table or destroyed.

    Learning Points:

    The team will quickly have an initial Product Backlog that is ready to be ordered and sized. It takes the emphasis off of any one facilitator or manager and engages ALL participants. This method also appeals to people that think better by themselves than in large groups (introverts).

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    2014 San Jose Budget Games2014 San Jose Budget Games2014 San Jose Budget Games2014 San Jose Budget Games2014 San Jose Budget Games

    December 12th, 2013

    Fellow game players, facilitators, and creators,

    For the past 4 years, the city of San Jose has used Innovation Games’ “Buy a Feature” game to help balance their budget.

    The goal is to bring citizens into the budget building process and to get them engaged in the community.  They have also done this in Kortrijk, Belgium.

    For those of you that don’t know, Innovation Games is a collection of very practical “serious games” for producing work and it was founded by Luke Hohmann, an active member of the agile game community and author of the Innovation Games book.

    This year, the San Jose Budget Games plan to go from involving hundreds of citizens to TEN THOUSAND citizens! The only way they can achieve this is by playing online… and they need help.

    Would you be willing to donate an hour of your time to facilitate one of the online games Jan 23, 24, or 25? If so, you can sign up here.

    Check out this video of a previous budget game session.

    If you would like to know a little more information about what is expected, please read the information below from Innovation Games.

    Thanks!

    Don McGreal
    @donmcgreal

    Facilitation:

    Facilitation will mainly consist of making sure participants understand the system, keeping the conversation moving and on track, and coordinating with other volunteers if the in-person group requests a SME.

    Because the game is typically fast paced, the facilitator might have difficulty writing down notes. The observer is there to capture game dynamics and interactions that the game cannot capture. Observers will be critical to the in-person games because the participants will be much more likely to talk to each other instead of using the chat functionality. The conversations will be important for processing the data after the game. It is best practice to have both roles at each table.  

    A training session will be held January 17 to give people new to facilitation and observation an understanding of the do’s and don’ts, along with training on the online tool. 

    —————————————————

    About Budget Games:

    This is our 4th year working with San José to produce the Budget Games. The goal is to bring citizens into the budget building process and to get them engaged in the community. San José has had its share of financial difficulties and has squeezed its spending to get things under control. Because this affects the citizens directly, the City wants to understand how the citizens prioritize items (such as parks and crime prevention units) within the budget. The results of the Games feed into the budget discussions held by city officials and bring a greater understanding of the city services the people hold in the highest regard.

    The Game consists of 8-10 people ‘buying’ the services they like. This year, we hope to gather preferences for potentially spending ~$34 million dollars gained through a proposed sales tax increase.

    In previous years, we have used in-person games with physical money and calculators. We are pleased to expand the games to an online format this year! Community leaders invited to the in-person game will have tablets allowing them to play the game. Another addition to the normal Game is the expansion to the greater San José public via the online platform. We hope to get 10K citizens involved!

    January 18 has been designated for in-person play and online play will occur January 23 – 25.

    We are looking for facilitators and observers for the in-person and the online game slots, which are 1 hour long. It would be fantastic if you could tell your friends and colleagues about this event and encourage them to get involved! Please click here to sign up to facilitate!

     

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    The Domino EffectThe Domino EffectThe Domino EffectThe Domino EffectThe Domino Effect

    September 12th, 2012

    Ingredients

    99 Dominoes
    A yard stick for each team

    Directions

    Notify 3 teams that they are about to build a tower exactly 20 and 5/8 inches high using the 33 dominoes provided.

    Ask teams for estimates on how long it will take them. They will usually estimate somewhere around 8-10 minutes.

    Pick one ‘tiger-team’ and tell them you really believe in them and you believe they can do it in half the time: <4 minutes. (It is practically impossible to get it done in 4 minutes… we’ve tried)

    Then tell another ‘slack team’ to take it easy and give them 15 minutes.

    Leave the other team at the original 8-10 minute mark.

    Start the timer and watch the fun.

    The ‘tiger team’ will have a lot of tension as they rush to stack the dominoes. They will experience frustration and it isn’t unusual to see some in-fighting.

    After the 4 minutes are up, examine their work and voice your disappointment. Give them an extra 2 minutes and tell them that they better get it this time. They won’t. So give them another 2 minutes and be sure to mention what a nice manager you are. 🙂

    By this time the 8-10 minute team should be pretty much done. In our testing, 8 minutes is a good amount time to build the tower.

    What is interesting is that the ‘slack team’ almost always uses most of their 15 minutes, demonstrating Parkinson’s Law.

    Debrief by asking each team how they felt during the exercise. Which had the best team dynamics?

    Learning Points

    • Teams pressured to deliver “faster” are often less productive and deliver less than those with reasonable expectations.
    • Teams under stress get stuck in the ‘Storming’ stage and cannot perform to their potential.
    • Trust team’s estimates (and other decisions) and see them gain more ownership and performance.
    • Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion (Parkinson’s Law)

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    Agile Game Incubator – Agile Games 2011

    July 4th, 2011

    In April, Mike and I had the pleasure of doing another Game Incubator as an Agile Games 2011 Deep Dive session.

    We facilitated three 90 minute sessions with a group of enthusiastic participants:

    1. In Session 1, we of course kicked things off with a game 🙂 and then introduced our five step approach and shared some guidelines. The five steps are Problem, Lead objectives, Aspects, Invent, Debrief – PLAID (pronounced PLAYED 🙂 ). We ended the first session by forming teams around the most popular Problems, who then presented their Lead objectives to the rest of the group.
    2. Session 2 was all about Invention. While keeping in mind the principles of Inspiration, KISS, and Courage, teams collaborated and innovated until the beginnings of a game emerged.
    3. The main goal of Session 3 was to provide a safe environment for teams to present and play their games with the other participants and receive feedback.

    When the dust settled, we had 4 great games:

    Don’t Blow It – Lead Objective: Trust is important, yet hard to earn and easy to lose.
    The Big Payoff – Lead Objective: Maximize portfolio value by finishing smaller projects earlier to gain value sooner.
    Timebox Box – Lead Objective: The value of timeboxing.
    Pizza Portfolio – Lead Objective: Prioritize your portfolio to optimize the business’ ROI.

    The next day, each incubator game was entered in the AgileGames Game Tournament. And out of all the excellent games played that day, ‘The Big Payoff’, conceived just the day before, won ‘Most Creative Game’! Congratulations to the creators, Alex Boutin and Erwin Van Der Koog!

    Mike and I will be facilitating another Game Incubator at Agile 2011. Hope to see you there!

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    Deep Agile 2010: Empowering Teams with Agile Games

    March 9th, 2010

    TastyCupcakes is excited to be a part of this year’s Deep Agile 2010, where the topic is ‘Empowering Teams with Agile Games’.

    Come Join Don and Mike, along with other game guru’s like Tobias Mayer, Lyssa Adkins, and Portia Tung as they take you through a two-day deep dive into using collaborative and interactive games to enable Agile teams.

    May 15 and 16 in Boston, MA.

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    Pocket-sized PrinciplesPrincípio de BolsoPrincipios de Bolsillo

    January 24th, 2010

    Timing:

    15 minutes

    Ingredients:

    • Copies of the twelve principles of agile software (http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html)
    • White-boards and/or flip-charts
    • Markers

    Recipe:
    This is an exercise that we came up with to better communicate the twelve principles behind the Agile Manifesto. In their existing form, it is challenging for people to read and understand each principle and, just as importantly, to easily refer to them later.

    • Divide participants in to groups, each with a white-board or flip-chart and markers.
    • Have the teams write down the numbers 1 through 12.
    • Challenge each team to, within a 15 minute time-box, come up with three words maximum that effectively capture each of the twelve principles.
    • To avoid ‘analysis paralysis’, make sure to give the teams time updates throughout (e.g. 10, 5, 2, 1 minute warnings). You will find that teams will speed up towards the end.
    • When time is up, go through each principle and discuss which are the most important words. Sometimes I like to ask people what their most and least favorite principles are.
    • Post the condensed principles somewhere visible, so as to make it a regular talking point.

    Here is an example:

    1. Produce Value Early
    2. Welcome Change
    3. Iterative Delivery
    4. Daily Business Collaboration
    5. Trust Motivated Team
    6. Face to Face
    7. Working Software
    8. Sustainable Pace
    9. Technical Excellence
    10. K.I.S.S.
    11. Self-Organize
    12. Reflect and Adjust

    Learning Points:

    • This is an effective way of capturing each principle in a much more concise and memorable way.
    • Probably the most valuable part of this exercise, is in the discussion that the teams have when trying to come up with the words. They need to first understand the principle before breaking it down.
    • Teams can establish a collective understanding and ownership of each principle.
    • This also makes for a good review exercise in a classroom environment.

    Tempo:
    15 minutos
    Materiais:

    • Cópias dos doze princípios do software Agile (http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html)
    • Quadros brancos e/ou flip-charts
    • Marcadores

    Receita:
    Esse é um exercício que criamos para melhor comunicar os doze princípios por trás do Manifesto Ágil. Da forma como estão escritos, é um desafio para as pessoas lerem e entenderem cada princípio e, tão importante, de serem capazes de se referirem a eles mais tarde.

    • Divida os participantes em grupo, cada um com um quadro branco ou flip-chart e marcadores.
    • Faça os times escreverem os números de 1 a 12.
    • Dentro de um período de 15 minutos, desafie cada time a criar no máximo três palavras que efetivamente capturem cada um dos doze princípios.
    • Para evitar a ‘paralisia da análise’, certifique-se de avisar frequentemente a cada time sobre o tempo (por exemplo, avisos a 10, 5, 2, 1 minuto do final). Você verá que os times aumentarão de velocidade à medida que se aproximam do final.
    • Quando o tempo acabar, passe por cada princípio e discuta quais são as palavras mais importantes. Às vezes gosto de perguntar às pessoas quais princípios são seus mais e menos favoritos.
    • Coloque os princípios condensados em algum lugar visível, de forma a transformá-lo em um ponto de conversa regular.

    Segue um exemplo:

    1. Produzir valor mais cedo.
    2. Dar boas-vindas à mudança.
    3. Entrega iterativa.
    4. Colaboração diária de negócios.
    5. Acreditar em um time motivado.
    6. Face a face.
    7. Software funcional.
    8. Passo sustentável.
    9. Excelência técnica.
    10. K.I.S.S.
    11. Auto-organizar.
    12. Refletir e ajustar.

    Pontos de aprendizado:

    • Essa é uma forma efetiva de capturar cada princípio de forma bem mais concisa e fácil de lembrar.
    • Provavelmente a parte mais valorosa desse exercício é a discussão que os times devem ter durante a criação das palavras. Eles precisam primeiro entender os princípios antes de desmembrá-los.
    • Os times podem estabelecer um sentimento de entendimento e propriedade coletivos de cada princípio.
    • Também pode ser um bom exercício de revisão em um ambiente de sala de aula.

      Duración: 15 minutos
      Ingredientes:

      • Copias de los doce principios de software ágil (http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html)
      • Tableros y/o Pizarras
      • Marcadores

      Receta:
      Este es un ejercicio que nos acerca a una mejor comunicación de los doce principios detrás del Manifiesto Ágil. En su forma actual, es difícil entender cada uno de ellos con sólo leerlos; e igualmente importante, referirse fácilmente a estos posteriormente.

      • Divida a los participantes en grupos, cada uno con un tablero o pizarra y marcadores.
      • Pida a los equipos que anoten los números del 1 al 12.
      • Solicite a cada equipo que, dentro de un tiempo de 15 minutos (time-box), con tres palabras como máximo definan de forma efectiva cada uno de los doce principios.
      • Para evitar una “parálisis de análisis”, asegúrese de notificar el tiempo restante cada tanto (por ejemplo, advertencias de 10, 5, 2, 1 minutos). Usted notará que los equipos aceleran la marcha cuando se va acercando el final.
      • Cuando el tiempo esté cumplido, discuta para cada uno de los principios cuales son las palabras más importantes. A veces me gusta preguntar a la gente cuáles son sus principios favoritos y cuáles no.
      • Publicar los principios condensados en alguna parte visible, a fin de que sean un tema regular de conversación.

      Aquí está un ejemplo:

      1. Producir valor Temprano
      2. Bienvenido el cambio
      3. Entrega Iterativa
      4. Colaboración diaria [con el] negocio.
      5. Equipo Confiado [y] motivado.
      6. Cara a cara
      7. Software funcional
      8. Paz Sostenible
      9. Excelencia Técnica
      10. KISS (keep it Simple, Stu…) [Mantenerlo Simple]
      11. Auto-Organización
      12. Reflexionar y Ajustar

      Puntos de aprendizaje:

      • Esta es una forma efectiva de captar cada uno de los principios de una manera mucho más concisa y memorable.
      • Probablemente la parte más valiosa de este ejercicio, es la discusión que los equipos tienen cuando tratan de encontrar las palabras. Tienen que entender primero el principio, antes de descomponerlo.
      • Los equipos pueden establecer una comprensión colectiva y propiedad sobre cada uno de los principios.
      • Esto también lo convierte en un buen ejercicio de revisión en un ambiente de aula.

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        TastyCupcakes Published in Agile Journal

        November 10th, 2009

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        White Elephant SizingWhite Elephant SizingWhite Elephant SizingИзмерение Белого Слона

        September 26th, 2009

        Note: If you haven’t heard of White Elephant Gift Exchanges before, read this.

        Ingredients:

        • Sizing board (a whiteboard or flip-chart or the like; divided into 5 columns: XS, S, M, L, XL)
        • Timer
        • A set of prepared stories
        • A set of 5 X 3 cards
        • Tape for attaching the cards to the board

        Recipe:

        Have the team stand-up in a half circle facing their sizing board.

        Shuffle a deck of story cards and place them face down on a table in front of the sizing board. Place a timer next to the cards.

        The game begins when the facilitator starts the timer, which is the signal for the first member to perform the following steps:

        • pick the top card off the deck
        • attach a piece of tape to the card
        • read the story on the card out loud
        • assigns the card to one of the five columns on the board (XS, S, M, L, XL)
        • provide a reason to the group
        • start the timer for the next player

        It is important assigning the card to one of the five columns has to be the player’s own decision, without any external interference. This is why the player should provide the reason for his or her decision after the card has been assigned. If the player does not assign the card within one minute, the card will be assigned to the column in the middle. The player then restarts the timer for the next player.

        After sizing the card, the player presents his or her reason. The reason may be based on expert knowledge, from past experiences, or observations from other projects. It is essential that the rest of the team observes and listens carefully to understand the overall context and development of the board. All other team members are therefore silent without discussions or judgment.

        After a few rounds, there should be enough cards on the board to give the team members the option to, on their turn, move an existing card on the board into a different column instead of picking a new card from the deck. As before, the player reads the story out loud followed by a reason which supports the decision to re-size.
        Once all user story cards are on the board and sized, each team member, on their turn, can either continue moving cards between columns or simply “pass” if they are satisfied with the current results. If a player does not make a decision within the one-minute time-limit, it will be interpreted as a “pass”.

        The game ends when the pile of story cards is gone and every member of the team signals “pass”.

        Challenges:
        The biggest challenge in the beginning is the lack of a reference story – the Chihuahua (see Doggy Planning). Because no card has been assigned yet, the first player will not have something to compare his or her story to. And since the cards will be shuffled, we won’t know if the first stories are really small, medium, or large until we uncover more stories. This is OK and and important lesson of the game. Every player will have the opportunity to change their mind in future rounds, so the important thing is to just get started. Remember, the game does not stop until all players signal “pass”.

        It is quite typical that two or more players disagree about a few assignments, and the card may end up endlessly moving up and down the board. If this happens, just take the card and place it on the bottom of the deck. That way, the sizing can continue and the card should have more context after all the other cards have been sized.

        Learning Points:

        • Group user stories according to their relative size/effort
        • Reach a democratic consensus quickly
        • Ensure that each team member has a say
        • Learn how user stories are captured
        • Actively collaborate in a fun way

        Variations

        • Play with 3 (S,M.L) columns instead of 5 (XS, S, M, L, XL)
        • Begin with 3 columns until the team requests more granularity, then the moderator adds additional columns
        • Assign the Fibonacci sequence to the columns (1,2,3,5,8)

        CREDIT: Jochen KrebsNote: If you haven’t heard of White Elephant Gift Exchanges before, read this.

        Ingredients:

        • Sizing board (a whiteboard or flip-chart or the like; divided into 5 columns: XS, S, M, L, XL)
        • Timer
        • A set of prepared stories
        • A set of 5 X 3 cards
        • Tape for attaching the cards to the board

        Recipe:

        Have the team stand-up in a half circle facing their sizing board.

        Shuffle a deck of story cards and place them face down on a table in front of the sizing board. Place a timer next to the cards.

        The game begins when the facilitator starts the timer, which is the signal for the first member to perform the following steps:

        • pick the top card off the deck
        • attach a piece of tape to the card
        • read the story on the card out loud
        • assigns the card to one of the five columns on the board (XS, S, M, L. XL)
        • provide a reason to the group
        • start the timer for the next player

        It is important assigning the card to one of the five columns has to be the player’s own decision, without any external interference. This is why the player should provide the reason for his or her decision after the card has been assigned. If the player does not assign the card within one minute, the card will be assigned to the column in the middle. The player then restarts the timer for the next player.

        After sizing the card, the player presents his or her reason. The reason may be based on expert knowledge, from past experiences, or observations from other projects. It is essential that the rest of the team observes and listens carefully to understand the overall context and development of the board. All other team members are therefore silent without discussions or judgment.

        After a few rounds, there should be enough cards on the board to give the team members the option to, on their turn, move an existing card on the board into a different column instead of picking a new card from the deck. As before, the player reads the story out loud followed by a reason which supports the decision to re-size.
        Once all user story cards are on the board and sized, each team member, on their turn, can either continue moving cards between columns or simply “pass” if they are satisfied with the current results. If a player does not make a decision within the one-minute time-limit, it will be interpreted as a “pass”.

        The game ends when the pile of story cards is gone and every member of the team signals “pass”.

        Challenges:
        The biggest challenge in the beginning is the lack of a reference story – the Chihuahua (see Doggy Planning). Because no card has been assigned yet, the first player will not have something to compare his or her story to. And since the cards will be shuffled, we won’t know if the first stories are really small, medium, or large until we uncover more stories. This is OK and and important lesson of the game. Every player will have the opportunity to change their mind in future rounds, so the important thing is to just get started. Remember, the game does not stop until all players signal “pass”.

        It is quite typical that two or more players disagree about a few assignments, and the card may end up endlessly moving up and down the board. If this happens, just take the card and place it on the bottom of the deck. That way, the sizing can continue and the card should have more context after all the other cards have been sized.

        Learning Points:

        • Group user stories according to their relative size/effort
        • Reach a democratic consensus quickly
        • Ensure that each team member has a say
        • Learn how user stories are captured
        • Actively collaborate in a fun way

        Variations

        • Play with 3 (S,M.L) columns instead of 5 (XS, S, M, L. XL)
        • Begin with 3 columns until the team requests more granularity, then the moderator adds additional columns
        • Assign the Fibonacci sequence to the columns (1,2,3,5,8)

        CREDIT: Jochen KrebsNote: If you haven’t heard of White Elephant Gift Exchanges before, read this.

        Ingredients:

        • Sizing board (a whiteboard or flip-chart or the like; divided into 5 columns: XS, S, M, L, XL)
        • Timer
        • A set of prepared stories
        • A set of 5 X 3 cards
        • Tape for attaching the cards to the board

        Recipe:

        Have the team stand-up in a half circle facing their sizing board.

        Shuffle a deck of story cards and place them face down on a table in front of the sizing board. Place a timer next to the cards.

        The game begins when the facilitator starts the timer, which is the signal for the first member to perform the following steps:

        • pick the top card off the deck
        • attach a piece of tape to the card
        • read the story on the card out loud
        • assigns the card to one of the five columns on the board (XS, S, M, L. XL)
        • provide a reason to the group
        • start the timer for the next player

        It is important assigning the card to one of the five columns has to be the player’s own decision, without any external interference. This is why the player should provide the reason for his or her decision after the card has been assigned. If the player does not assign the card within one minute, the card will be assigned to the column in the middle. The player then restarts the timer for the next player.

        After sizing the card, the player presents his or her reason. The reason may be based on expert knowledge, from past experiences, or observations from other projects. It is essential that the rest of the team observes and listens carefully to understand the overall context and development of the board. All other team members are therefore silent without discussions or judgment.

        After a few rounds, there should be enough cards on the board to give the team members the option to, on their turn, move an existing card on the board into a different column instead of picking a new card from the deck. As before, the player reads the story out loud followed by a reason which supports the decision to re-size.
        Once all user story cards are on the board and sized, each team member, on their turn, can either continue moving cards between columns or simply “pass” if they are satisfied with the current results. If a player does not make a decision within the one-minute time-limit, it will be interpreted as a “pass”.

        The game ends when the pile of story cards is gone and every member of the team signals “pass”.

        Challenges:
        The biggest challenge in the beginning is the lack of a reference story – the Chihuahua (see Doggy Planning). Because no card has been assigned yet, the first player will not have something to compare his or her story to. And since the cards will be shuffled, we won’t know if the first stories are really small, medium, or large until we uncover more stories. This is OK and and important lesson of the game. Every player will have the opportunity to change their mind in future rounds, so the important thing is to just get started. Remember, the game does not stop until all players signal “pass”.

        It is quite typical that two or more players disagree about a few assignments, and the card may end up endlessly moving up and down the board. If this happens, just take the card and place it on the bottom of the deck. That way, the sizing can continue and the card should have more context after all the other cards have been sized.

        Learning Points:

        • Group user stories according to their relative size/effort
        • Reach a democratic consensus quickly
        • Ensure that each team member has a say
        • Learn how user stories are captured
        • Actively collaborate in a fun way

        Variations

        • Play with 3 (S,M.L) columns instead of 5 (XS, S, M, L. XL)
        • Begin with 3 columns until the team requests more granularity, then the moderator adds additional columns
        • Assign the Fibonacci sequence to the columns (1,2,3,5,8)

        CREDIT: Jochen KrebsПримечание: Про обмен подарками по принципу Белый Слон можно прочитать здесь.

        Материалы:

        • Доска для измерений (флип-чарт или белая доска, разделённые на 5 колонок: XS, S,
          M, L, XL)
        • Секундомер
        • Набор подготовленных историй
        • Пачка карточек 10х15
        • Скотч для крепления карточек на доску

        Правила:

        Расставьте участников полукругом лицом к доске. Перетасуйте карточки с историями и разложите их на столе перед доской рубашкой вверх. Положите секундомер рядом с карточками. Игра начинается, когда ведущий запускает секундомер. По этому сигналу первый участник выплняет следующие действия:

        • Берёт верхнюю карточку из колоды
        • Приклеивает к ней кусок скотча
        • Зачитывает вслух историх на карточке
        • Приклеивает карточку в одну из пяти колонок на доске (XS, S, M, L. XL)
        • Объясняет остальным, почему он так сделал
        • Запускает секундомер для следующего игрока

        Очень важно, чтобы игрок сам решил, в какую из пяти колонок приклеить карточку, без всяких советов от других. Именно поэтому участник должен рассказать о причинах, по которым отнёс карточку в ту или иную колонку. Если участник не смог за минуту определить карточку в одну из колонок, она по умолчанию попадает в центральную. Участник перезапускает секундомер для следующего участника. Оценив историю на карточке,
        участник рассказывает о причинах, по которым он сделал такую оценку. Это может быть экспертное знание, прошлый опыт, наблюдение за другими проектами. Очень важно, чтобы остальные участники внимательно слушали и понимали общий контекст и изменения на доске. Поэтому очень важно, чтобы остальные участники сохраняли молчание, без обсуждений и не вынося никаких суждений. После нескольких раундов на доске будет достаточно карточек, чтобы дать участникам возможность в свой ход перенести уже приклеенную карточку в другую колонку, вместо того, чтобы приклеивать новую карточку. Как и прежде, участник зачитывает историю вслух, после чего рассказывает причины, по которым он производит переоценку. Когда все карточки историй окажутся на доске в той или иной колонке, участники могут в свой ход либо продолжать двигать карточки между колонками (с обоснованием), или просто “пасовать”, если их устраивает текущий расклад. Если участник не принимает решения в течение 1 минуты, он считается спасовавшим. Игра заканчивается, когда колода карточек опустеет и все участники спасовали.


        Преодолеваемые трудности:

        Самое сложное в этой игре – отсутствие референсной истории – Чихуахуа (см. Собачье Планирование).
        Пока ни одна карточка никуда не отнесена, первому участнику не с чем сравнивать свою историю. Исходно карточки тасуются, и мы даже не знаем, первые истории – они на самом деле маленькие, средние, или большие – пока не откроем последующие карточки. Это совершенно нормально, и является важным уроком игры. У каждого игрока будет возможность в последующих раундах передумать, поэтому важно просто начать.
        Помните, что игра не остановится, пока все участники не спасуют. Очень вероятно, что два или более участников будут несогласны с расположением нескольких карточек, которые так и будут передвигаться туда-сюда по доске. Если это произойдет, снимите карточку с доски и положите её вниз колоды. Это позволит продолжить оценку остальных историй, а к проблемной карточке вернутся в последнюю очередь, в условиях расширенного контекста.

        Выводы:

        • Группировка историй по их относительному размеру/трудоёмкости
        • Быстрое достижение демократичного консенсуса
        • Каждый участник получает возможность высказаться
        • Научиться записывать истории
        • Активное сотрудничество в увлекательной форме

        Вариации

        • 3 колонки (S, M, L) вместо 5 (XS, S, M, L, XL)
        • Начните с 3 колонок, пока участники не потребуют большей детализации, затем добавьте ещё 2 колонки
        • Оценить колонки числами Фибоначчи (1, 2, 3, 5, 8 )

        АВТОР: Jochen Krebs
        Перевод Alex Pchelintsev

        VN:F [1.9.16_1159]
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        People PollingVotaçãoVotaciónОпрос людей

        July 14th, 2009

        Timing: 10 mins

        Ingredients:

        • A good-sized audience – 10 or more (the bigger the better)
        • Pens & paper for all

        Recipe:

        It is best to sneak this exercise in when it is least expected.
        Start by selecting something in the room that is not easily counted or estimated. Take the time to write the exact number down and hide it from the audience.
        Then, have each individual quickly and privately write down their own estimate.
        Gather all of the estimates and calculate the average.
        Cross your fingers and unveil the number that you wrote down earlier. It should be relatively close to the group average.

        I have done similar exercises about a dozen or so times and the results are usually spot on. However, there is always a chance that the results could be off, so always make sure to start by announcing that you want to perform an experiment together. Participants will understand if the results are not perfect.

        Some things you can use to estimate:

        • Your weight – although people tend to be generous and the estimates are usually low. 🙂
        • Number of books available on Amazon.com
        • Number of words on a page – I’ve had the most success with this one. In a class environment, I’ll use the lab write-up and have the students write their estimate on the back.
        • Number of steps it takes to walk from one side of the room to the other – this one is fun, but you could get accused of rigging the outcome.
        • Balloons in the room – only works if you played the 99 Test Balloons game earlier. 😉
        • Please leave a comment to share some of your ideas and experiences.

        Other helpful hints:

        • To keep things quick, open a spread sheet to type in everybody’s estimate as they show them to you. This also makes it easy to calculate the average in front of everybody.
        • Analyze the data with the class. You will likely get a very wide variance. I often find that no one individual estimate is as close as the average. This speaks to the true wisdom of the crowd and of the importance of diversity.
        • To make it even more interesting, give a prize to whomever had the most accurate estimate.

        Learning Points:

        • The accuracy of the group estimate is usually stronger than any one individual’s.
        • The larger and more diverse the crowd is, the better the estimate.
        • Agile embraces this principle by involving the whole team in estimating and planning and by encouraging the creation of cross-functional teams.

        Tempo: 10 minutos
        Ingredientes:
        • Uma audiência significativa – 10 ou mais (quanto maior melhor)
        • Caneta e papel para todos

        Receita:

        O melhor é improvisar esse exercício quando  for menos esperado.
        Comece selecionando alguma coisa ao redor que não pode ser facilmente contado ou estimado.
        Reserve um tempo para anotar o número exato e escoda-o da audiência.
        Então, peça que cada indivíduo escreva rapidamente e de forma reservada sua própria estimativa.
        Colete todas as estimativas e calcule a média.
        Cruze os dedos e revele o número que você havia anotado anteriormente. Esse número deve ser relativamente próximo à média do grupo.
        Eu tenho feito exercícios similares tantas vezes e os resultados são geralmente acertados. Entretanto, sempre há uma chance que os resultados possam sair fora, então sempre tenha certeza de começar anunciando que você  quer realizar um experimento em conjunto. Os participantes irão entender se os resultados não forem perfeitos.
        Algumas coisas que podem ser usadas para estimar:

        • Seu peso – embora algumas pessoas tendem a ser generosas e as estimativas são geralmente baixas.
        • Número de livros disponíveis no Amazon.com
        • Número de palavras em uma página – Eu tenho tido mais sucesso com este. Em um ambiente de sala de aula, eu usaria o bloco de anotações do laboratório e os estudantes escreveriam suas estimativas no verso.
        • Número de passos para caminhar de um lado até o outro lado da sala – esse é engraçado, mas você pode ser acusado de estar burlando o resultado.
        • Balões na sala – só funciona se você jogou o  jogo 99 Balões de Teste previamente.
        • Por favor, deixe um comentário para compartihar suas idéias e experiências.

        Outras dicas úteis:

        • Para manter as coisas rápidas, abra uma planilha e digite a estimativa de todos como foi mostrado a você. Isso também torna fácil o cálculo da média na frente de todos.
        • Analise os dados com a classe. Você provavelmente vai notar uma grande variação. Eu sempre percebo que nenhuma estimativa individual é tão próxima como a média. Isso fala sobre a verdeira sabedoria coletiva e a importância da diversidade.
        • Para tornar ainda mais interessante, dê um prêmio para quem tiver a estimativa mais precisa.

        Pontos de aprendizagem:

        • A precisão da estimativa do grupo é geralmente mais forte que qualquer estimativa individual.
        • Quanto maior e mais diversificado o público, melhor a estimativa.
        • O Ágil embarca esses princípios envovendo todo o time nas estimativas e planejamentos e incentivando a criação de times multi-funcionais.

        Duración: 10 minutos
        Materiales:
        • Una audiencia significativa – 10 o más (cuantos más, mejor)
        • Papel y boli para todos
        Receta:
        Es mejor introducir este ejercicio cuando menos se espera.
        Comienza seleccionando algo en el aula que no sea fácil de contar o de estimar. Anota el número exacto y escóndelo a los asistentes.
        Entonces haz que cada participante anote su propia estimación rápidamente y en privado.
        Reúne todas las estimaciones y calcula la media. Cruza los dedos y revela el número que anotaste previamente. Debería ser relativamente cercano a la media obtenida por el grupo.
        He hecho ejercicios similares aproximadamente una docena de veces, y los resultados son generalmente acertados. De todas formas siempre existe la posibilidad de que los resultados estén muy alejados, así que asegúrate siempre de empezar anunciando que quieres realizar un experimento. Los participantes lo entenderán si los resultados no son perfectos.
        Algunas cosas que puedes usar para estimar:
        • Tu peso – aunque la gente tiende a ser generosa y las estimaciones son normalmente bajas.
        • Número de libros disponibles en Amazon.com
        • Número de palabras en una página – Con éste es con el que he tenido más éxito. En un ambiente de clase, yo usaría the lab write-up y haría que los estudiantes anotaran sus estimaciones en la parte de atrás.
        • Número de pasos que cuesta caminar de un lado a otro de la habitación – éste es divertido, pero te podrían acusar de amañar el resultado
        • Globos en la habitación – sólo funciona si has jugado previamente al juego 99 Test Balloon.
        • Por favor deja un comentario para compartir tus ideas y experiencias.

        Otras sugerencias útiles:

        • Para acelerar, abre una hoja de cálculo para introducir las estimaciones de todos a medida que te las dicen. Esto facilita también el calcular la media delante de todo el mundo
        • Analiza los datos con la clase. Probablemente obtengas una varianza grande. Normalmente encuentro que ninguna estimación individual es tan exacta como la media. Esto nos habla de la verdadera sabiduría de la multitud y de la importancia de la diversidad.
        • Para hacerlo más interesante, da un premio al que más se acerque en su estimación.

        Puntos de Aprendizaje:

        • La exactitud de la estimación del grupo es generalmente mayor que la de cualquiera de sus individuos.
        • Cuanto mayor y más diverso es el grupo, mejor es la estimación.
        • Agile incorpora este principio involucrando a todo el equipo en la estimación y planificación, y estimulando la creación de equipos multi-funcionales.

          Время: 10 минут
          Материалы:

          • целевая аудитория в количестве 10 и более человек (чем больше, тем лучше)
          • Ручки и бумага для всех

          Правила: Лучше давать это упражнение, когда оно меньше всего ожидается.
          Для начала выберите в комнате что-нибудь, что не просто сосчитать или оценить. Не торопитесь. Запишите точное число и спрячьте листик от аудитории.
          Затем, пусть каждый участник быстро и в частном порядке запишет свое собственное предполагаемое число.
          Соберите все варианты и вычислите среднее число.
          Скрестите пальцы и объявите число, записанное ранее. Оно должно быть относительно близко к среднему числу группы.
          Я делал подобные упражнения приблизительно дюжину раз, и результаты, как правило, точны. Однако всегда есть вероятность того, что результат может быть далек от правильного, так что желательно начать с объявления, что вы хотите провести эксперимент. Участники поймут, если результаты не будут совершенными.
          Некоторые вещи, которые можно использовать для оценки:

          • Ваш вес – хотя, несмотря на то, что люди имеют тенденцию быть щедрыми, предположения обычно невысоки.
          • Количество книг, доступное на Amazon.com
          • Количество слов на странице – у меня было наибольшее число благоприятных исходов с этим примером. В классе я буду использовать лабораторное описание и студенты пишут свои оценки на обороте.
          • Количество шагов, необходимое для прогулки с одной стороны комнаты в другую – это забава, но тут вас могут обвинить в подтасовке результата.
          • Воздушные шары в комнате – работает, только если раньше вы играли в игру “99 Тестовых Шариков (99 Test Balloons)”
          • Пожалуйста, оставьте свои комментарии, поделитесь своими идеями и опытом.

          Другие полезные советы:

          • Для упрощения откройте электронную таблицу для того, чтобы напечатать предположения каждого человека, когда они показывают их вам. Это также позволяет легко вычислить среднюю величину на глазах у всех.
          • Проанализируйте данные вместе с группой. Вероятно, вы получите довольно широкую дисперсию. Я часто нахожу, что ни одна оценка отдельного человека так не близка к правильной, как средняя. Это говорит об истинной мудрости толпы (группы людей) и важности разнообразия.
          • Чтобы сделать упражнение более интересным, дайте приз тому, кто сделал наиболее точное предположение.

          Выводы:

          • Групповая оценка обычно более точна, чем оцека, данная любым из участников индивидуально.
          • Чем больше и более разнообразна группа людей, тем лучше результат.
          • Agile использует этот принцип, привлекая целую команду к оценке и планированию и поощряя создание кросс-функциональных команд.
          Перевод Vladimir Kurka

          VN:F [1.9.16_1159]
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          Rating: 4.7/5 (6 votes cast)

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